The Top 10 Houses That Perfectly Embody Biophilic Design

The Top 10 Houses That Perfectly Embody Biophilic Design

The word ‘biophilic’ has been making rounds in the architecture world recently, and for good reason. With our cities falling victim to overcrowding, it is extremely important to mitigate the effects of urbanization to the best of our ability and preserve the remaining green parts, which are slowly but surely dying. Biophilic design aims to create spaces that help us build and maintain an intimate connection with nature. It is an architectural approach that seeks to connect our human tendency to interact with nature, with the buildings in which we live. Biophilic design elements can be effortlessly integrated into any living space simply by adding green plants and natural light. These elements create environments that are peaceful, tranquil, and nurturing in which to reside. They positively affect our mental and general well-being. And we’ve curated a couple of houses that do this perfectly! From a minimal Japanese house with an interior garden to a concrete house with a ramp-shaped cascading green roof, these architectural structures fully embody biophilic design.

1. Welcome to the Jungle House

Designed by CplusC Architectural Workshop for its director Clinton Cole, Welcome to the Jungle House has been built partly from recycled materials in Sydney. The house has a garden on the roof and an aquaponics system inhabited by fish.

Why is it remarkable?

The house was designed and built as an experiment in sustainable urban living. The rooftop garden and aquaponics system serve as the main elements of the home and were incorporated in an effort to help residents have and maintain a stronger and better connection with nature.

What we like

  • Designed to combat the climate emergency
  • Equipped with solar panels

what we don’t like

  • Climate change has already disrupted the home aquaponics system

2. Chalet KD45

Located in the bustling and hot city of New Delhi is Villa KD45, a stately home defined by a flowing, ramp-like green roof adding a somewhat surreal and biophilic element to the brutalist, concrete house. The house rises like a gentle wave, from the landscaped lot on which it has been built, giving the impression of a subtle tsunami flowing over an angled property.

Why is it remarkable?

In addition to featuring a unique cascading shape, the ceiling is populated with concrete planters, adding a rather relaxing green effect. The rest of the house is also heavily marked out with trees, gardens, and lots of shrubbery. The striking presence of green in the home contrasts beautifully with the concrete and rough look of the home, tactfully balancing rough and smooth, soft and hard.

What we like

  • The terrace also has a landscaped garden, offering beautiful views of the neighborhood park.
  • Large sliding doors create an attractive indoor-outdoor connection between this section and the garden.

what we don’t like

  • The property seems quite difficult to maintain.

3. Atri


Created by a company called Naturvillan, Atri is a newly built A-frame villa located on the shores of Lake Vänern. With a rather large form, which instantly catches the eye, the house also manages to be self-sufficient, climate-smart and sustainable. It’s like a sustainable greenhouse in the middle of the mountains! The house also offers stunning views of the lake, as well as the majestic trees that surround it, and a natural terrain with rock slabs.

Why is it remarkable?

Atri features a traditional A-shaped shape, with a fairly stable base embedded directly into the mountains. It also features a continuous axis, giving you a glimpse of the entire house in one view! As he slowly looks up at the house, he notices that he blends artfully into the trees, effortlessly becoming part of the natural landscape and appearing as if he is at one with nature.

What we like

  • Self-sustaining and sustainable
  • smart weather

what we don’t like

4. Oasis Towers


Dutch architecture firm MVRDV designed the Oasis Towers development in Nanjing, China. Functioning as a residential and commercial complex, the structure is made up of two L-shaped skyscrapers with intriguing cascading terraces. The facades of the skyscrapers imitate the cliffs, giving them an irregular and geometrically interesting appearance.

Why is it remarkable?

The most interesting highlight of the towers is the lush green ‘oasis’ located in the center of the site. This green landscape slowly moves outwards and blends in harmoniously with the cascading terraces. It functions as the biophilic element of the architectural structure, and quite imposing as well. “With Oasis Towers we wanted to take this trend to the fullest, not only emulating nature with curved and layered ‘cliffs’, but also literally incorporating nature into the design with vegetation and taking advantage of natural processes,” said the MVRDV co-founder. Winy Maas.

What we like

  • The terraces are lined with recycled bamboo and are covered with trees and other green areas.
  • The green space guarantees the privacy of the residents who stay on the upper levels.

what we don’t like

5. The house on the slope


International 3D visualizer and architect Milad Eshtiyaghi is known for his enchanting architectural creations, which you always want to see in real life! Some of them are concepts, while others manage to transform into something tangible. The Slope House is one of his non-traditional creations that perfectly embodies biophilic design inside and out. The house is an A-frame cabin, but quite unconventional. It’s an angular log cabin that sits perched on top of an idyllic hillside, somewhere deep in the Brazilian rainforests.

Why is it remarkable?

Called the Slope House, the log cabin maintains a characteristic triangular framework that is a thoughtful twist on the conventional A-frame cabin. The house has been fitted with two modules: one is an internal structure housing the master bedroom, while the another contains all the main spaces: the kitchen, the dining room and the study. Eshtiyaghi’s small cabin is envisioned as supported by a beam system that was specifically chosen to minimize the house’s impact on the existing landscape.

What we like

  • The house is a rather unconventional and fun twist on the traditional A-frame cabin.
  • Natural plants have been added inside the house as a small garden

what we don’t like

  • The theme and shape of the house may be too eccentric for some.

6. The melted house


Melt House was built at the request of a young family who wanted to “feel green” in the house in which they were staying. It was designed by Satoshi Saito of SAI Architectural Design Office and was intended to be a house that not only feels and looks green, but is truly green at its core, and allows the family to actively use outdoor space and grow together with the environment. green.

Why is it remarkable?

The main attraction of this house is its centerpiece, which is basically a dry garden that acts as a multifunctional room right in the middle of the house. The double-height space almost resembles a patio, connecting the two main structures that make up the house. The clerestory windows have been threaded through the space, allowing a generous amount of sunlight in, while sliding doors separate you from the outside. This creates an interesting indoor/outdoor connection.

What we like

  • It has an impressive dry garden that also functions as a multifunctional room.
  • The house allows its residents to grow green

what we don’t like

  • A garden in the middle of the house can be difficult to maintain and tends to

7. Raintree House


Raintree House is a beautiful modern sanctuary boasting stunning views of the ocean as well as the exotic jungle surroundings. It’s located in the northwestern province of Guanacaste, Costa Rica, and was designed to “feel like it’s always been there.”

Why is it remarkable?

The house aims to be a fine specimen of sustainable architecture and blends seamlessly with its surroundings. The project was led by the studio’s design director, Benjamin G Saxe. It is heavily inspired by the tall trees placed around it, as well as the tangled foliage and raised canopy placed near it.

What we like

  • It causes minimal damage to the environment of the house.
  • sustainable + ecological

what we don’t like

8. Easyhome Huanggang Vertical Forest City Complex


Five towering sustainable green towers were designed together to create the Easyhome Huanggang Vertical Forest City Complex. This complex was built in an effort to mitigate the effects of urbanization and fight for the survival and environmental preservation of our cities. This is extremely critical as our cities are increasingly populated and it is imperative to focus on sustainable and biophilic architecture in these current times.

Why is it remarkable?

Designed to be “a completely innovative green space for the city”, the forest city complex is a form of biophilic architecture that incorporates abundant and growing vegetation into the structure and essence of residential buildings.

What we like

  • 404 different trees complete the Easyhome design, absorbing 22 tons of carbon dioxide and producing 11 tons of oxygen over the course of a year.
  • Increases biodiversity by attracting new species of birds and insects.

what we don’t like

9. The house on the wall


Designed by CTA, Wall House is a multi-generational family home located in Bien Hoa, Vietnam. The house is marked by perforated bricks that are designed to bring air and sunlight into the house. These perforated square bricks help create a living space that feels open, flowing and airy, which were the clients’ requirements.

Why is it remarkable?

To create a broad connection between the interior and exterior, a small garden was created around the periphery of the house. This was done by planting trees and green leafy plants throughout the house, which in turn added a beautiful biophilic element to the house. The presence of the trees and plants makes you feel like you are in a garden and not in someone’s house!

What we like

  • Large amounts of light and air flow into the home, improving air quality.

what we don’t like

  • Home aesthetics may not be to everyone’s liking.

10. House of Hugs


This modern green home architecture concept is called the Hugging House and features a beautiful garden roof while managing to incorporate the site’s natural landscape into its design. Designed by Veliz Arquitecto, the Hugging House is still a concept, but we’d love to see it come to life.
Hugging House is a modern concept of green home architecture that features a landscaped roof and incorporates the natural landscape of the land into its design.

Why is it remarkable?

If built, the location of the Hugging House would be fully incorporated into the design of the house. Describing the design in his own words, Veliz Arquitectos points out: “We have taken advantage of the slopes of the land to create visual connections at different heights with the existing vegetation and beyond the landscape, as well as [used] the premises with which we always try to characterize the project.”

What we like

  • It has a garden roof.
  • An intriguing floating staircase

what we don’t like

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